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Aug. 19th, 2014

Anne

simone_remy

Camille's response to Marat's criticism

This piece is from Revs no 76 following a misprint in no 73 (apostat instead of apostolat) I love it for it's wicked wit, especially comparing the fragrant J-P to a dog, Camille's concern with linguistics at the beginning and where he says that journalists are like poets, in a comic pre-echo of his last letter.


It appears that there was a significant misprint in my no 73; apostasy instead of evangelism, although the copies remaining with me say evangelism. Firstly the language indicates that it should be read as evangelism, then the contextual sense, because in this phrase I am praising Marat for his quality of steadfastness. In spite of this Marat takes the opportunity to send me eight pages of abuse.
Listen Marat: I simply advise you not to follow Gauthier's example so closely and to abuse people in place a little less. As for me, I give you permission to be as abusive to me as you like. You write in a subterranean hole, where the atmosphere is not conducive to merry thoughts and could make a Timon out of a Vade. You are perfectly correct to assert your seniority over me, and to scornfully refer to me as 'young man' as it is twenty four years since Voltaire  made fun of you; to call me unfair since I said you were the journalist who had best served the revolution; to call me malicious since I am the only writer who had dared to defend you; and, finally, to call me unpatriotic, since a clumsy misprint crept into a few copies.
Marat - it is useless to tell me your complaints, as you did six months ago; I tell you that as long as I see you raving on behalf of the revolution I will continue to praise you, because I believe that we must defend freedom like the town of St Malo - not only with men but with dogs.


I ask my readers' forgiveness for having taken up space in my journal to reply to Marat which should have been entirely devoted to public affairs. In doing so I have shown the weakness of following his example: journalists are like poets, genus irritabile. It is quite enough that I scorn to pay attention to the shitload of aristocratic insults which never fail to stop at my door each morning; that pile of manure is left by Marchand, Gauthier, Champigny and Etienne and merely fertilises my earth, but when I see Marat's tri-coloured cart stop there too, out of respect for the tri-coloured cart I am compelled to let him know my thoughts.
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Jun. 18th, 2014

Anne

simone_remy

Final part of Revolutions edition 1

I think the most personal bits come at the end, when he writes about the reaction in London to the play about Storming the Bastille, and his childhood reflection on suicide so I've put the cut above them ~ I do hope I've not got the translation about suicide wrong, it's one of those passages where the pronouns are a bit tricky ~  don't hesitate to correct if I have.

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The Storming of the Bastille is still playing in London and at the moment when Launay is led to the Ville, the actors shout: <long live the French> The orchestra section and the theatre boxes take up the cry and, enthused by the play, all the genuine people of London are getting drunk on our wine and toasting the health of the French people. Oh, my English brothers, I wish you well, and I too will drink punch to your health; from morning to evening I will shout < Long live the English! Long live the Americans! Long live the French patriots![because there is still some wild grain] Long live the patriots of Brabant! English, Americans, French, shall we not go to the aid of our patriotic brothers of Brabant whom that evil Joseph II wishes to enslave? Will we remain like Moses, lifting up his arms to heaven and making wishes on the mountain top, while Joshua is battling down on the plain?>
A letter from M. Malouet to the comte d’Estaing has been denounced by his colleagues of the research committee. The debate went on till midnight, the majority sent the accusation back. For us, here is our judgement: Non liquet.
On Thursday an abbe threw himself off the tower of Notre Dame. A packet of crushed glass was found on him and part of a letter which contained his complaints against a superior at the seminary, some Busiris in a cassock, whom this poor man accused of being the author of his despair. I remember that in my childhood I said to my father: there are so many suicides, how does it not turn out that they tell themselves, before quitting this world, at least I would like to free them from their tyrants and to serve society.
I will die no less, but I will die less culpable.
It is true that as there are no more tyrants in France, this unfortunate abbe would have had a long trip to make, and he had only four livres and four sols in his pocket. Oh, how many poor devils there are!

Jun. 11th, 2014

Anne

simone_remy

First half of first edition of Revolutions de France etc [28th November 1789]

I'll get the second half done asap, I think it's more personal

Revolutions de France et de Brabant no.1

Consummatum est, it is all over. The King is in the Louvre, the National Assembly is in the Tuileries; the circulatory channels have cleared themselves. The market is overflowing, the national funds are refilled, the mills turn, traitors flee, the clergy is overthrown, the aristocracy is breathing its last, the schemes of Monniers and Lally are thwarted and the provinces go hand in hand with no wish to be disunited; the constitution is signed, the patriots are victorious, Paris has escaped bankruptcy, famine and the desolation with which it was threatened; Paris will be the queen of cities, and the glory of the capital will match the majesty and grandeur of the French Empire.

After the defeat of Persia, when Emilus-Paulus descended from his triumphal chariot and entered the temple of Jupiter-Capitoline, a deputy from the towns of Asia, haranguing the senate from the door, addressed him with this speech:

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May. 4th, 2014

Anne

simone_remy

Topino Lebrun trial notes - meant to get them done for Germinal - sorry

We know that Camille made tragically few contributions to the trial itself, and most of the notes are about Danton, but there is an immediacy to Topino's scrappy notes, made while he was listening to the accused, that made me want to put a translation up - and it's interesting that Camille's first interjection is noted to have caused  'sincere gaiety and mirth' amongst the accused deputies. The original copy of Topino's notes is online at Gallica.

Germinal 13 Day One

Topino lists the details of the accused with no notes except for Danton

Georges-Jacques Danton, 34, born in Arcis sur Aube, dept de l’Aube, advocate, deputy to the convention, - <soon my dwelling will be in nothingness and my name in the pantheon of history, whatever they say one thing is certain and doesn’t matter to me, - the people will have respect for my head, yes, my guillotined head>

Westerman asks to undergo interrogation. The president remarks that it is an unnecessary procedure.

Danton – We are, however, here for the procedure.

W. insists- a judge is going to interrogate

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Mar. 3rd, 2014

vorrago

La France Libre English Translation - Part VI

[I realized I must have forgotten to post this. Terribly sorry for the delay. Happy birthday, Camille!]

--- La France Libre index --

Opening
Part I
Part II

Part III
Part IV
Part V first half
Part V second half
Part VI

VI
What constitution is best suited for France?

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Feb. 27th, 2014

Anne

simone_remy

Lantern part 1

Introduction to Discours de la Lanterne aux Parisiens...............
The ever lovely Camille added some ridiculously long footnotes to The Lantern ~ I have put them in appendices to the relevant sections ~ they contain some familiar themes.


The Discours de la Lanterne aux Parisiens first appeared through Garnery as a 67 page brochure in octavo; it was preceded by a two page foreword in small type: This edition was unsigned. The second edition, corrected and augmented, was dated thus:

The first year of liberty in France

It contained 72 pages and also contained the dedicatory title To Our Lords in Parliament. This edition was signed ‘by the author of La France Libre’. The third edition, reviewed, corrected and considerably augmented is signed by Camille Desmoulins. The pagination is identical to the first edition, the author’s only deletion is the dedicatory title. This third edition is notable for its engraved frontispiece which shows the Hotel-de-Ville and the famous lantern, or lamppost.

DEDICATORY TITLE

TO OUR LORDS IN THE TOULOUSE PARLIAMENT

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Anne

simone_remy

Lantern part 2

After pausing for a while to catch her breath, the illustrious lantern continued in these terms:

Now comes the time when I must mingle into these praises some just complaints. So many scoundrels have escaped me! Not that I like justice to be too speedy. You know that I gave signs of discontent during the ascent of Foullon and Bertier[1]; twice I broke the noose. I was convinced of the treason of these two rascals; but the carpenter rushed the whole business. I would have preferred an interrogation and the exposure of certain facts.

Blind Parisians, if you fail to note these facts you may perhaps allow proof of the conspiracy woven against you to wither; and since it only lends its ministry to justice and the patrie you will dishonour the lantern. My fame will pass and I will remain defiled by these murders down the centuries. See how Morande is already libelling me in his Courrier de l’Europe and in le Gazetier! I leave the burden of my vengeance to this country’s lanterns. As the passionate journalists say

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Anne

simone_remy

Appendix to Lantern 2

Appendix to part 2

4 ~ On Thursday 16th a trunk full of sulphurous fuses was seized from a house located next to the Hotel de Ville. At the same time, trials of gunpowder were discovered extending from that house right up to the cellars of the galleries. One of the electors brought the news to the military committee who immediately sent commissaires to check the facts. The commissaires’ report confirmed the truth of the information.

5 ~ The Lantern had not read the Marquis’s supporting poster.

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Anne

simone_remy

Lantern part 3

The Courrier de Versailles a Paris notes that there are clearly powerful secret forces behind these insurrections. A few poverty stricken people, whose daily toil scarcely preserves them from starvation, spent a few days in the public square. They were paid for it. We have seen men distributing money amongst these low class people: What will they do for it? What of this abbé, whom we had wanted to detain because he had been denounced by worthy witnesses, whom we bound to come before the lantern and face questioning. What has become of the so called chevalier, decorated with a foreign order, on whom we only postponed judgement not abandoning judgement completely? What became of so many other suspected people whose escape has been facilitated? Shouldn’t the National Assembly, in the name of justice, give a public account of what these people have done and of their interrogation?

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Anne

simone_remy

Appendix to Lantern 3

1 ~, M. le Tellier is the author of this pamphlet and has just been arrested and taken to l’Abbaye. The Lantern is opposed to the principles of this lawyer, who is an enemy of progress, but she will make no less loud a complaint that he has been wronged when the nation raises an altar to press freedom. The sun shines for the bad as well as the good. Today press freedom is violated in the person of an aristo writer, but when the thirty tyrants erased the list of citizens Theramenes wrote ‘it is no more difficult for Critias to wipe out your role as citizen than to erase Theramenes. We must make a big fuss and demand freedom for this poor devil of an author and make an example of Miromesnil, who, despite bearing a hated name, knew how to insinuate himself among the representatives of the commune, and who, in his role as head of the police committee, ordered the detention of M. le Tellier. When Beauvilliers was sent to l’Abbaye, certainly with good cause, every gourmet in Paris rose up in defence of this cook. Yet when press freedom is violated by an imprisonment no one speaks up for the writer! Parisians are like the Athenians to whom Socrates said ‘I am a doctor, I plead my case against a pastry cook, and you are children, so I will lose my case’

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